What is DBT?

DBT means Dialectical Behavior Therapy, which could also be referred to as becoming more open minded. A dialectic is a dialogue between opposites. Dialectical therapy seeks the ability to tolerate opposites and to see truth in more than one perspective. DBT is an offshoot of CBT, or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This branch of psychology is aimed at helping you understand your thinking and behavior choices so they are more effective for your life and happiness.

Mindfulness is balancing emotion mind and wise mind.Distress Tolerance is when you have a problem you cannot solve, but you don't want to make it worse.Emotion Regulation is having less negative emotions and vulnerability, and more positive emotional experiences.Interpersonal Effectiveness is asking for what you want and saying no effectively.

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Observing-Your-Breath Exercises

OBSERVING YOUR BREATH

"Focus your attention on your breath, coming in and out. Observe your breathing as a way to center yourself in your wise mind. Observe your breathing as a way to take hold of your mind,dropping off non-acceptance and fighting reality.

1. DEEP BREATHING
Lie on your back. Breathe evenly and gently, focusing your attention on the movement of your stomach. As you begin to breathe in, allow your stomach to rise in order to bring air into the lower half of your lungs. As the upper halves of your lungs begin to fill with air, your chest begins to rise and your stomach begins to lower. Don’t tire yourself. Continue for 10 breaths. The exhalation will be longer than the inhalation.

2. MEASURING YOUR BREATH BY YOUR FOOTSTEPS
Walk slowly in a yard, along a sidewalk, or on a path. Breathe normally. Determine the length of your breath, the exhalation and the inhalation, by the number of your footsteps. Continue for a few minutes. Begin to lengthen your exhalation by one step. Do not force a longer inhalation. Let it be natural. Watch your inhalation carefully to see whether there is a desire to lengthen it. Continue for 10 breaths.

3. COUNTING YOUR BREATH
Sit in a comfortable position on the floor or in a chair, lie down, or take a walk. As you inhale, we aware that “I am inhaling, ONE.” When you exhale, be aware that “I am exhaling, ONE.” Remember to breathe from the stomach. When beginning the second inhalation, be aware that “I am inhaling, TWO.” And, slowly exhaling, be aware that “I am exhaling, TWO.” Continue up through 10. After you have reached 10, return to ONE. Whenever you lose count, return to ONE.

4. FOLLOWING YOUR BREATH WHILE LISTENING TO MUSIC
Listen to a piece of music. Breathe long, light, and even breaths. Follow your breath; be master of it while remaining aware of the movement and sentiments of the music. Do not get lost in the music, but continue to be master of your breath and yourself.

5. BREATHING TO QUIET THE MIND AND BODY
Sit or lie in a comfortable position that you can sustain without movement. Deliberately relax your body. Scan and relax several times. Breath through any areas of tension. Half-smile. Follow your breath. When your mind and body are quiet, continue to inhale and exhale very lightly; be aware that “I am breathing in and making the breath and body light and peaceful. I am exhaling and making the breath and body light and peaceful.” Continue for three breaths, giving rise to the thought, “I am breathing in while my body and mind are at peace. I am breathing out while my body and mind are at peace.” Continue for 5-25 minutes, as you are able."

DBT skills adapted by Jane Rekas, LCSW for use from Linehan, M.M. (1993). Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder. New York: Guilford Press. P

box breathing

No comments:

Post a Comment